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A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

8: The Long Form Book Review:

In the last post we discussed the structure of the review and looked more closely at the commercial format. We discussed the appropriateness of posting a commercially formatted review at a retail website, and we very briefly discussed the long form review and why it belongs at your blog. If you’ll remember, the distinction between these two formats is that the commercial review serves as an endorsement of a book, whereas the long form review serves as the discussion of a book.

In the long form review you can explore the characters and the plot far more deeply than the author could or should in the blurb. In the long form review you can discuss some of the questions raised and some of your emotional experience of the story. You can and should discuss how the book related to something in your own life. In the long form review you are at liberty to expand on what you feel is important for a reader to know—about the story, the theme, or whatever it was that touched you or inspired you about the book. Remember, when looking for a book to review you are looking for a gem. You are looking for a thoughtful novel that provokes an emotional response. Among the many reasons for seeking such novels is the fact that you will be required to think about it, to write about it and to spend your time with the novel in question. Another good reason is the opportunities such a novel provides to you. Continue reading

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A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

7 Two Texts For One Review: The Structure of the Indie Book Review

You have your notes, you have contemplated and considered and gathered your thoughts. Now it’s time to write. Don’t write directly onto your blog. Don’t write directly into the form field at Goodreads or Amazon. Use your word processor, or a pen and paper if you’re that sort, and write. Just write. If the book was great, no doubt you have a lot to say, and you should write every word of it now. Then edit. Then revise and rewrite and reconsider. Then do it again. Remember, reviewing is like writing because it is writing. Writing is drafting and editing and polishing over and over and over again. Do this until you have two finely polished texts.

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How to Review Books on a Book Blog

A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

6: Reading to Review:

At the outset, quite a few aspiring reviewers will read the full book, and then set out to summarize the story and the experience as though “the reading” and “the reviewing” are separate functions. They are not separate functions at all. You are not reading for entertainment, you’re reading toward a purpose. You’re reading to prepare yourself to write on a topic, that being the book you chose. You’ll need to express the emotional experience presented in the book and although you may also need to discuss the way the book made you think about this or that, in the review of any work of fiction, it is the emotional experience that is key. Your own thoughts and feelings should guide you to your conclusion regarding the work. It should guide you to how many stars you offer, and it should guide you to what you have to say in your review. Here’s how to do that: Continue reading

How to Review Books on a Book Blog

A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

5: Responding to Book Review Requests:

You’re reading now. You’re reading a lot. If you do too much in one sitting, if you read too many blurbs and previews, one after the other, you may find that instead of reading with a sense of hopeful anticipation, you are beginning to feel impatient and maybe you’ve started dismissing books without giving them a fair chance to capture your imagination. If you find yourself in this situation, you can give yourself a break while still making progress. You can respond to some of the authors who requested reviews of books that you’ve decided not to review. Continue reading

How to Review Books on a Book Blog

A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

4: Choosing Your First Book To Review

In the last post we discussed getting your “leads,” by posting to one or more threads in the various Goodreads groups that relate to the genres that interest you. In this weeks post we’ll discuss the way to follow up those leads with a mind toward finding a good, great or mind-blowing book to review.

One of the first things you’ll notice while browsing the responses that your post has generated is that indie authors are typically quite bad at following directions. You’ll have messages in your Goodreads in-box, and responses within your post, even if you asked the authors to use your contact or submission form at your blog. Bear with them. Don’t by-pass a book because the author is a little clumsy like this. Chalk it up to the fact that like most people, Indie authors tend to be rushed and hurried and even a little awkward where self-promotion and marketing is concerned. They tend to miss the details. You might want to give those authors who did follow your directions a little edge (priority) but don’t skip the others, there might just be a gem waiting there for you.

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How to Review Books on a Book Blog

A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

 

3: Finding Your First Book To Review

We all want to start off with a bang. It’s fun and a little exciting to launch a blog. It’s fun to start out in any new venture. Naturally, as a reviewer you’ll want to start, not with just a good book, but with a great book! You certainly won’t want to start with just any book. But how do you find the perfect book for your launch?

 

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How to Review Books on a Book Blog

A Letter to Aspiring Book Reviewers A Blog Series

2: The Role of the Book Review:

Authors and publishers want good reviews because good reviews promote sales. Readers want honest reviews because they are looking for the next book to buy. The reader is your audience. As a reviewer it is your job to serve them, not the author and not the publisher, and, in all fairness, not yourself. The reader seeks your guidance. They want to resolve the uncertainty that they feel with their mouse hovering over the “buy” button. They wonder: is this book worth my time and effort and attention? They ask: “Is this a book that is worth reading?” and “Is the experience of reading this book something I will enjoy?” The role of the review, and the task before the reviewer, is to answer those questions. Continue reading